Interview with Valerie Comer and book giveaway

Today I’m interviewing contemporary romance author Valerie Comer on the Australasian Christian Writers group blog. We’re also giving away an electronic copy of Valerie’s latest release, Raspberries and Vinegar. The interview can be found at the following link. Hope to see you there!

http://australasianchristianwriters.blogspot.com.au/2013/09/interview-with-valerie-comer-and-book.html

I wrote a book recommendation for Raspberries and Vinegar a few weeks ago. Check it out at the following link.

https://narelleatkins.wordpress.com/2013/09/10/book-recommendation-raspberries-and-vinegar-by-valerie-comer/

ACRBA tour: Streets on a Map by Dale Harcombe

 
 

23 – 27 September

Australian Christian Readers Blog Alliance

Introducing

Streets on a Map

(Ark House Press December 2010)

By

Dale Harcombe

 
 
 
 

About the Book:

Every choice carries a price as Abby discovers when she marries Joel. If she had known when Joel first walked into Clancy’s what lay in store, she would have stopped the relationship before it got started. However, by the time she found out it was too late. The choice was made. Or so she thought.

But then between her and her one friend in Astley, Laila, they arrive at solution that could benefit Abby and the small county town. A deliberately lit fire and an unplanned pregnancy threaten to bring their carefully laid plans and Abby’s dreams undone. Problems of some newcomers to the town impinge on Abby’s life too, but it is the arrival of an old resident of Astley that could end up destroying everything and not just for Abby.

Who else’s lives will be affected and changed forever. Will the unwelcome arrivals in Astley destroy everything Abby and Laila have worked to achieve? What is the secret that will have all of Astley reeling? 

 
 

About the Author:

Streets on a Map was published by Ark House Press. Prior to that Dale has had seven children’s books and Kaleidoscope a collection of poetry published. Many poems in Kaleidoscope have been previously published in Australia’s literary magazines. She has won prizes for her poetry and has been published in several anthologies.

Along with her husband, Dale was for a time houseparent for a family of twelve boys. She has also been a manuscript assessor and book reviewer and run creative writing classes. She has also written bible studies and Sunday school lessons. For several years she wrote about Christian living, marriage and home related topics for www.families.com. She has a BA in Literary and Australian studies. More information about Dale can be found at www.daleharcombe.com or on her Write and Read with Dale blog
http://www.livejournal.com/users/orangedale/

ACRBA tour: What would Jesus drive? (Car Park Parables series) by Paul Clark and Graham Preston

 

September 16 – 20

Australian Christian Readers Blog Alliance

Introducing 

What would Jesus drive? (Car Park Parables series)

(Even Before Publishing March 2012)

by

Paul Clark, illustrated by Graham Preston

 

About the Author:

 
Paul Clark is married with two kids. He has nearly 20 years experience in children’s and youth ministry having worked in both the city and rural areas. Paul has a knack of sharing the gospel message, simply and profoundly through story – something he is very passionate about. With 10 titles to his name, and more on the way, his resources are down to earth, Australian, and to be watched!
 

About the Book:



It is Palm Sunday in the Church Car Park and Jesus is riding into Jerusalem. The only problem is deciding what Jesus would have driven into Jerusalem if there had been cars in his time. Was it a motorbike because Jesus was a rebel? Was it a truck so he could stand on the back and teach the crowd? Was it a bus because he was a man of the people and he could have brought his friends along? Find out what the cars think! Part of the Australian Car Park Parables series.

Narelle: What would Jesus drive? is an engaging story that poses an interesting question. It’s Palm Sunday and the cars in the church car park are taking turns guessing what type of car Jesus would have chosen to drive into Jerusalem on Palm Sunday if cars had existed back then. Each car comes up with a different answer, providing insightful reasons behind their choices that are both humourous and reveal Jesus’ character. When the true answer is revealed, the cars learn more about the significance of Jesus’ role in the Easter story.

I love the Australian flavour in the story. The illustrations are cute and the text is easy to read. I recommend this book to parents and carers looking for a relevant and informative story that explains Biblical truth in a fun and light hearted way for primary school age children.

Many thanks to Even Before Publishing for providing a review copy.

Book Recommendation: Raspberries and Vinegar by Valerie Comer

Raspberries and Vinegar

Back Cover blurb:

Breaking ground with the Farm Fresh Romance series, in RASPBERRIES AND VINEGAR Josephine Shaw and her two friends renovate a dilapidated farm with their sights set on more than just their own property. However, transforming the town with their sustainable lifestyle and focus on local foods is met with more resistance than they expected, especially by neighbor Zachary Nemesek. Jo needs to learn that a little sweet makes the tart more tasty.

Narelle: I really enjoyed reading Raspberries and Vinegar. Jo and Zach are fascinating characters who are drawn to each other despite having different life philosophies. Jo and her friends, Claire and Sierra, are intent on ‘practicing what they preach’ by creating a sustainable living farm. Their beliefs regarding sustainable living and decreasing their carbon footprint have a Biblical foundation. The girls are prepared to make sacrifices, including temporarily living in a rundown caravan with an ongoing mice problem, to fulfill their dream of creating a sustainable farm. They also strive to engage the local community in learning about how they can live in a more sustainable way.

Zach enjoys the culture and convenience of city living. He grew up on the farm next door to Jo and the girls, and is he is only back in town  temporarily to help his mother while his father recovers from a serious illness. At the start of the story Zach can’t understand why Jo and her friends are determined to create a new life on the farm.    

Sparks fly whenever Jo and Zach are together, and an adorable pup called Domino creates a lot of mischief in the story. Raspberries and Vinegar is a fun romance that addresses important issues without being preachy. The story is contemporary and touches on issues that are relevant to twenty-somethings in today’s society. Both Jo and Zach experience character growth during the story and the plot twists kept me turning the page to find out what happens next. I highly recommend this book to those looking for an exciting and inspiring contemporary romance.

Read a FREE sample at Amazon.com

ACRBA tour: An Unholy Communion by Donna Fletcher Crow

2 – 6 September 2013

Introducing

An Unholy Communion

Lion Hudson (1 April 2013)

by

Donna Fletcher Crow

About the Author:

“Donna Fletcher Crow has created her own niche within the genre of clerical mysteries.” – Kate Charles, author of Deep Waters

First light, Ascension morning. From the top of the tower at the College of Transfiguration, voices rise in song.

Felicity’s delight turns to horror when a black-robed body hurtles over the precipice and lands at her feet.

Her fiancé Father Antony recognizes the corpse as Hwyl Pendry, a former student, who has been serving as Deliverance Minister in a Welsh diocese. The police ignore the strange emblem of a double-headed snake clutched in the dead man’s hand, labelling the death a suicide. But Hwyl’s widow is convinced otherwise, and pleads for Felicity and Antony to help her uncover the truth.

Matters grow murkier as Felicity and Antony, leading a youth pilgrimage through rural Wales, encounter the same sinister symbol as they travel. Lurking figures follow them. Then a body is found face-down in a well …

“Donna Fletcher Crow gives us, in three extremely persuasive dimensions, the world that Dan Brown merely sketches.” – Timothy Hallinan, author of The Queen of Patpong

About the Book:

Donna Fletcher Crow is the author of 40 books, mostly novels dealing with British history. The award-winning Glastonbury, A Novel of the Holy Grail, an Arthurian grail search epic covering 15 centuries of English history, is her best-known work. She is also the author of The Monastery Murders: A Very Private Grave, A Darkly Hidden Truth and An Unholy Communion as well as the Lord Danvers series of Victorian true-crime novels and the literary suspense series The Elizabeth & Richard Mysteries. Donna and her husband live in Boise, Idaho. They have 4 adult children and 11 grandchildren. She is an enthusiastic gardener.

To read more about all of Donna’s books and see pictures from her garden and research trips go to: http://www.donnafletchercrow.com/

You can follow her on Facebook at: http://ning.it/OHi0MY

Narelle: I enjoyed reading this book. I’ve read Book 1, A Very Private Grave, and it was good to journey with Felicity and Father Antony again. Felicity is an American who studies at an English monastery where Father Antony is a lecturer. This book differs to the typical Christian fiction book because it explores the historic Anglo-Catholic roots and traditions of the Anglican Church in England. The Monastery Murder series have plots that are connected to the early church in Britain, going back as far as the early centuries AD when the saints lived and the Christian faith spread through the known world from Rome.

Antony and Felicity are engaged to be married, and become embroiled in a modern day murder mystery when a dead body falls out of a church bell tower during the Ascension morning service and lands at Felicity’s feet. The man is holding a piece of paper with a distinctive snake emblem on it. Felicity reaches for the paper and it ignites, reducing to ashes for no apparent reason. Antony and Felicity embark on a youth pilgrimmage walking tour through Wales, following in the steps of Saint David. They are accompanied by a quirky group who add colour and flavour to the story. A series of unusual events occur that suggest a supernatural force may be at work. I recommend this book to those interested in reading a supernatural murder mystery that explores early British church history.

Many thanks to Lion Hudson for providing a review copy.